Deadpool 2—Family and Lots of Death

Deadpool 2 movie poster
Deadpool 2

Deadpool 2 is a little hard to describe succinctly. Wade Wilson, Deadpool, is a super non-hero who finds himself suicidal after the death of the love of his life, but due to his mutant healing ability, he can’t die. The movie is funnier than it sounds. Also, like its predecessor, NOT for kids. Graphic violence and sex jokes abound.

1—They Kill Vanessa, Goddamnit

I liked Vanessa, she was well developed and fun. Even the beginning credits call out how cruel it was to kill her just as she and Wade were about to start a family. That doesn’t mean she’s absent from the movie—Wade keeps seeing her as he almost dies—but I still miss her. Continue reading “Deadpool 2—Family and Lots of Death”

The Man Who Knew Too Little—Stupid but Fun

The Man Who Knew Too Little movie poster
The Man Who Knew Too Little

The Man Who Knew Too Little is a sendup of spy films. A hapless American on vacation in London gets wound up in an caper after inadvertently taking a phone call meant for a spy.

1—The Setup

Wallace Ritchie (played by Bill Murray) goes to visit his brother in England but his brother has a business meeting that night, and so arranges for Wallace to spend the evening at an interactive improv theater. But due to a mix up, instead of taking the theater’s phone call, he takes the phone call meant for a real spy. While trying to do “scenes” he accidentally foils plans to restart the Cold War. Continue reading “The Man Who Knew Too Little—Stupid but Fun”

Monty Python and the Holy Grail—A Silly and Perilous Quest

Monty Python and the Holy Grail movie poster
Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Monty Python and the Holy Grail is the Legends of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table as told by Monty Python . It is a fountain of memes for good reason. Like all Monty Python, there’s plenty of absurdist humor.

(Though do be warned if you react to quickly flashing lights that part of the beginning credits are really flashy.) (Also make sure to read the beginning credits subtitles.)

1—The Quest

After being given a quest from God, King Arthur and his knights set about seeking the Holy Grail. On the way they encounter an accused witch who undergoes trial by duck, Tim the Enchanter, a killer rabbit and many other weird things, most of which would take too long to explain for me to do so here. Some of the scenes are unconnected to the others—though still funny—and some come back into play in later scenes. This is definitely a sit-back-and-enjoy-the-ride kind of movie, at least it was for me. Continue reading “Monty Python and the Holy Grail—A Silly and Perilous Quest”

Soulless the Manga—Volume Two—Alexia Goes Floating to Scotland

Soulless the Manga Volume Two, by Gail Garriger and REM book cover
Soulless the Manga Volume Two, by Gail Garriger and REM

Soulless the Manga’s second volume is based on the novel Changeless—which is book two of the Parasol Protectorate—by Gail Carriger. The art is by REM. Miss Alexia Tarabotti, the titular Soulless, or Preternatural, is now Muhjuh to Queen Victoria and charged with finding out if a spate of mortalness in the local supernatural community is due to a plague or a weapon.

1—The Characters

There’s the depictions of Ivy’s outfits, particularly the hats. I liked getting to see Madame Lefoux in her suits and little Quesnel, scamp that he is. Of course, Sidheag Maccon, Conall’s descendant, complete with facial scar and cigar. We see more of Biffy and Lord Akeldama, and Professor Lyall, too. And I had forgotten how much I dislike Channing Channing of the Chesterfield Channings, but he is fortunately not in much of the book—though my sister likes him. Continue reading “Soulless the Manga—Volume Two—Alexia Goes Floating to Scotland”

Soulless the Manga—Volume One—A Condensed but Still Charming Version

Soulless the Manga Volume 1 by Gail Carriger, art by REM book cover
Soulless the Manga Volume 1 by Gail Carriger, art by REM

Soulless the Manga’s first volume is based on the novel Soulless—which is book one of the Parasol Protectorate—by Gail Carriger. The art is by REM. Miss Alexia Tarabotti, the titular Soulless, or Preternatural, has accidentally killed a starving vampire. Things only get more complicated from there in this steampunk action romcom.

1—The Art

The art in the Soulless Manga is suitably whimsical, with even background elements showing thought to the steampunk Victorian setting—such as during Alexia and her best friend Ivy Hisselpenny’s walk in the park. I particularly loved seeing Lord Akeldama’s outfits being brought to picture. And the wax-faced man was suitably creepy. There was a lot of cleavage on display though, mostly Alexia’s. Not that Conall wasn’t naked too. Nothing too scandalous was showing though. Continue reading “Soulless the Manga—Volume One—A Condensed but Still Charming Version”

Monty Python’s Life of Brian—Absurdist Non-History

Monty Python's Life of Brian movie poster
Monty Python’s Life of Brian

Monty Python is a British comedy group, with the most absurd sense of humor I’ve ever seen. This is their take on the life and death of Brian, who is definitely not the Messiah in Roman-occupied Judea.

Conclusion—I Don’t Know How to Review This Movie

If you have the kind of sense of humor that likes Monty Python, you’ll like this. If don’t, then you won’t. But it is a good introduction to their humor if you’ve been waiting to try them. There’s an actual narrative in the movie, however farcical. And ending with all the crucified men singing and whistling is just the perfect touch.

Julie & Julia—Two Stories, Only One of Which I Liked

Julie & Julia movie poster
Julie & Julia

Julie & Julia is the simultaneous stories of Julia Child learning to cook and publishing her landmark book, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and Julie Powell in 2002, who decides to spend a year making all the recipes in the book and blog about it.

1—Julia’s Story

Julia Child moves to Paris with her husband Paul, who works for the American government and was stationed there. Julia falls in love with the people and food and decides to attend Le Cordon Bleu. While at a party, she meets Simone Beck and Louisette Bertholle, who are writing a cookbook—a cookbook which needs to be rewritten. They ask Julia for help. After many trials, the book finally finds a home with Alfred A. Knopf and is published. Along the way, her sister gets married, her husband is interrogated by the government he serves (this was the McCarthy era), and she meets a pen pal. Continue reading “Julie & Julia—Two Stories, Only One of Which I Liked”

Soulless—Illustrated Hardcover Edition—Squee!

Soulless by Gail Carriger, illustrated by Jensine Eckwall book cover
Soulless by Gail Carriger, illustrated by Jensine Eckwall

Soulless, by Gail Carriger and this version illustrated by Jensine Eckwall, is titled after the preternatural Miss Alexia Tarabotti, whose touch renders supernatural vampires and werewolves mortal. The book, told in omniscient point of view, mainly follows Alexia as she flirts with an alpha werewolf, visits with a rove vampire, and gets kidnapped by mad scientists.

I know I’ve talked about the Parasol Protectorate series before, but not this individual book, and the issue of the illustrated hardback seemed the perfect time for a reread and a review.

1—The Illustrations

The illustrations in Soulless were charming. Done in a pen-and-ink style, they are intricately detailed. Scattered throughout the book, there are ten full-page illustrations that include a werewolf in wolf form carrying a coat, a walk through the park with dirigible floating overhead, Lord Akeldama holding his tuning fork-anti-eavesdropping device, and of course the first scene in the book with Alexia hitting a vampire with her parasol. There are other key moments illustrated, but I won’t tell about them since that would give some important plot points away. Continue reading “Soulless—Illustrated Hardcover Edition—Squee!”

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (movie)—Improbable Fun

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy movie poster
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy movie is a science fiction comedy that follows Englishman Arthur Dent and alien Ford Prefect after the Earth has been destroyed to make way for a hyperspace bypass. The movie is punctuated with humorous asides from the titular Hitchhiker’s Guide, which Ford writes for.

1—Beginning Again After the End of the World

Arthur wakes up to find bulldozers outside his house. Shortly thereafter, the Earth is surrounded by a Vogon Constructor Fleet and destroyed. But before that destruction, Ford and Arther hitch a ride on one of the spaceships—and shortly after that, they’re captured and subjected to Vogon poetry. After then getting tossed out of an airlock, Ford and Arthur are improbably rescued by Zaphod Beeblebrox, the President of the Galaxy who has stolen a ship with an improbability drive and kidnapped himself, and Trillian, a girl Arthur met once at a costume party. The improbable adventures continue from there. Continue reading “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (movie)—Improbable Fun”

The Emperor’s New Groove—Ridiculous Nonsense in the Best Way

The Emperor's New Groove movie poster
The Emperor’s New Groove

The Emperor’s New Groove is a Disney Movie that follows the Emperor Kuzco after he’s cursed and becomes a llama. He then has to rely on the peasant Pacha whose home he’d planned on destroying. It’s a buddy comedy that makes the most of using humor to get away with any and everything.

1—The Nonsense

We start the movie off with Emperor Kuzco narrating how his life got so off-track. He occasionally stops the story to do things like scribble over the top of it. Also, we get one instance of story-Kuzco arguing with narrator-Kuzco, with is very meta. There are plenty of anachronisms, like an electric floor buffer, and animals that don’t belong in a jungle, like a squirrel. During the final chase scene, Yzma and Kronk get taken out by a very localized lightning storm, only to reappear at Yzma’s secret lab and not know themselves how they got there. But oh well, on with the assassination attempt! The visual gags and use of “cartoon” physics just works in this movie. Continue reading “The Emperor’s New Groove—Ridiculous Nonsense in the Best Way”