Making Progress

My current reads--Curtsies and Conspiracies, Grave Importance, Dreyer's English
My current reads–Curtsies and Conspiracies, Grave Importance, Dreyer’s English

My two book system worked to get me through the last new book I read, but I haven’t needed it this week. I haven’t yet finished the new book (Grave Importance, by Vivian Shaw, book three in the Dr. Greta Helsing series) I’m reading, but I have managed to read just my new book without resorting to the old favorite (Curtsies and Conspiracies, by Gail Carriger, book two in the Finishing School series) this week. I have been reading some of my non-fiction book (Dreyer’s English, by Benjamin Dreyer), but that doesn’t take as much time as reading the old favorite, and I didn’t switch to it to come down from anxiety so much as because I just wanted to. Also I’ve often gone back to the Grave Importance after, which I’m about 1/3 of the way through! And though I haven’t managed to read every day this week, I’ve read more days of the week than not, which I consider another big win. All in all, I’m happy with my current reading progress.

Podcasts on the Business of Writing

I’m still working my way through my new book, so here’s a collection of podcasts that focus more on the business side of being a writer—important for both indies and traditionally published authors to know, since either way, being a published author means being a small business owner. Also, I’ve posted about most these podcasts somewhere before, but not in in a collection with this focus, so I’m doing it anyway.

1—The Creative Penn

The Creative Penn is hosted by Joanna Penn, a veteran of indie publishing. Her podcasts interview other authors, both fiction and non-fiction, and they discuss everything. Continue reading “Podcasts on the Business of Writing”

More Podcasts for Writers

I’m about a quarter of the way through Dracula (the original book by Bram Stoker)—it’s longer than I remembered—and hope to review that next week or the week after. So in the meantime, here’s some more podcasts for writers.

1—I Should Be Writing

I Should Be Writing, a podcast by Mur Lafferty for beginning writers. It consists of Mur’s observations, interviews with other authors, and her own journey as a writer. It’s a clean podcast—no swearing—and only the backlist from episode 264 onward (at time of this writing) is available for free. If you want to go further back than that, you need to subscribe to Mur’s Patreon. But it’s a long running podcast, up to 414 episodes (again, as of this writing), so there’s a lot to sink your teeth into. Continue reading “More Podcasts for Writers”

Yet More Tangential Links

It’s been a busy couple of weeks and I’m still working on that doorstopper of a book, but I just forgot to watch a movie this week to review. So here are some more links to some of my favorite sites.

1—The Creative Penn 

The Creative Penn has an excellent blog and podcast. The podcast, which I’ve been working my way through in reverse chronological order, currently has over four-hundred casts, most of which are approximately one hour long. So a nice long listen. Continue reading “Yet More Tangential Links”

Tangential Links

It’s been a very busy week and I haven’t finished my book yet, so here are some sites you might enjoy.

1—Tea and Jeopardy

A podcast hosted by Emma Newman who, with her politely evil butler Latimer, interviews authors, illustrators, agents, and all kinds of people over tea and cake. After which, the guests find themselves in some form of peril they must creatively escape.

Each week finds Emma and Latimer in a tea lair as well, and since acquiring their time machine, this can be anywhen as well as anywhere.

2—Lit Brick

“Sequential Comedies of Literature” as it says in the subtitle. John S. Troutman reads classics from the Norton Anthology and draws comics about whatever comes into his head. Hilarious, amusing, pick your adjective.

3—Writing Excuses

Another podcast, this one by a set of authors. Brandon Sanderson, Howard Taylor (who writes and illustrates the webcomic Schlock Mercenary), Dan Wells, and Mary Robinette Kowal (who also narrates audiobooks) talk about writing and everything to do with it. A must listen for writers, especially their series of podcasts on elemental genres.

4—XKCD

Stick figures and diagrams have never been so entertaining. Written and drawn by Randall Munroe, who manages to explain complex things with simple words in a way that I actually understand what he’s talking about but don’t feel talked down to. Some comics are just silliness. Either way, read the hover text, it’s always funny.

Reading About Other People Reading

My current reading obsessions are several erieses of articles on Tor.com. Here they are.

The Lovecraft Reread

A series of articles wherein “two modern Mythos writers get girl cooties all over old Howard’s original sandbox”. Rithanna Emrys and Anne M. Pillsworth summarize a story and the comment on it. Both ladies have great commentary on the cosmic horror stories. Continue reading “Reading About Other People Reading”

A Brief Collection of The UnBook Reporter’s Story Studying Resources

I need some more time before I’m back in full UnBook Reporting shape so tonight will be another short post tangentially related to my normal content. Still working on that project, and also changing antidepressants—things got bad enough during the previous two…three? weeks that I made an appointment to see my doctor.

Anyways, tonight I thought I’d share some of my favorite places online to research the all the elements that go into making a story.

Tvtropes—The Site That Formalized My Obsession

TvTropes Will Ruin Your Life and Your Vocabulary and I have happily embrace both forms of ruination. My first foray onto tvtropes was probably when I began officially studying story structure, character archetypes, genre conventions, and all the rest. I’ve always loved stories and found myself picking up on patterns, but tvtropes helped cemented my desire to actually study them. Seriously though, don’t even glance at that site unless you’ve got at least a solid three hours to spend down that rabbit hole. Continue reading “A Brief Collection of The UnBook Reporter’s Story Studying Resources”